“Trespass Against Us” Review

3 March, 2017

Director: Adam Smith
Screenwriter: Alastair Siddons
Director of Photography: Eduard Grau
Cast: 
Michael Fassbender, Brendan Gleeson

Synopsis: A family of crooks who have built up a foul reputation in their local community struggle to remain united after a slapdash heist makes them a prime target for the police.


Trespass Against Us Review:

A film of selfish ideals and inherited criminality, “Trespass Against Us” paints a disruptive picture of severe miseducation as an illiterate dad and his unsympathetic father attempt to support their family while showing complete disregard for the law. As the feature film debut of television director Adam Smith, “Trespass Against Us” takes a grassroots approach towards its subject matter, initially alienating global audiences with its thick West Country twang but also seeking to expose newcomers to the much-despised British traveller community whose antisocial antics as petty thieves and loafers has shaped the face of the UK landscape.

While the film doesn’t condone any part of their objectionable behaviour, there’s a sense of light-heartedness that comes with each disreputable act carried out by the family and it can often be a struggle to pinpoint where fun ends and the message begins in this tale of unmotivated chaos. In this sense, it’s no accident that “Trespass Against Us” is impossible for most viewers to relate to as its trailer park dwellers exist on the outskirts of everyday communities, passing the time with disruptive hobbies as they seek out money and infamy while accepting their inevitable path towards jail. Although some characters in Smith’s drama attempt to retain a level of righteousness for the sake of the community’s youngest and least developed members, Fassbender’s Chad Cutler is set on a path of self-destruction and his willingness to tease and provoke the local police is enough to destroy his family’s already tarnished image.

While the movie’s characters are ultimately flawed, its performers are perfectly cast in their roles, particularly Brendan Gleeson whose place as patriarch and resident conspiracy theorist becomes symptomatic of the backwardness that comes with being an uneducated outlaw. Outshone only by the ever-magnificent Michael Fassbender whose tracksuit hoodlum feels like a genuine resident of the Hemel Hempstead region, the identifiable leads are convincingly common and wonderfully mismatched, even if the drama itself is a cautionary tale that few are unfortunate enough to be able to match with the experiences of their everyday lives.

 

   

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