“Interstellar” Review

15 February, 2017

Year of Release: 2014
Director: 
Christopher Nolan
Screenwriters:
 Christopher Nolan, Jonathan Nolan 
Director of Photography: 
Hoyte Van Hoytema
Cast: 
Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway, Jessica Chastain

Synopsis: In an alternative future where crop blight threatens the survival of humanity, a team of NASA employees are sent on a daring mission to seek out a planet that can sustain life, passing through a wormhole on a quest to find a new home and prevent human extinction.

Interstellar Review:

Set on the cusp of the apocalypse, “Interstellar” is a multidimensional masterwork of epic proportions, crossing the boundaries of space and time with its universal tale of discovery during moments of complete uncertainty. Strong-minded but tender in its depiction of solitude, time travel, and the power unconditional love, “Interstellar” is a cinematic page-turner and it’s assembled with religious ambition by Christopher Nolan whose transcendent take on Sci-Fi opens the door to a discussion worth having about the importance of family during times of crisis.

A film where life finds a way during the slow crawl towards the end of the world, “Interstellar” is driven by its initial scenes of character development, placing a huge burden on its later space mission as a father sacrifices his life on Earth in a desperate attempt to save future generations. The movie cuts deep, cruising into unchartered territories as a pilot demonstrates the ultimate act of love by leaving behind everything he cares about, living the life of a dead man forced to watch his children grow old from a distance while unable to communicate or comfort them in their suffering.

Creating a less clinical and more outwardly moving alternative to science fiction classics like “Solaris” and “2001: A Space Odyssey,” the Nolan brothers place the human condition at the basis of their story, using exposition as a shorthand way to pacify viewers’ minds before they get to work drilling into the emotional core of their story. Although the film is complex in its exploration of cross-dimensional communication, it bridges the gap between science and sentiment as practised and proficient explorers come to experience the effects of great pain, fear, and loneliness over the course of their unpredictable journey.

 

   

Summary
Review Date
Movie
Interstellar
Rating
51star1star1star1star1star
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